SASH WINDOWS.EASYBOO.COM

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Contract Fitters & Suppliers Of Distinctive Window Replacement

A Subsidiary Of Easyboo.com

Beautifully Finished Window Replacement Fitted By Master Craftsmen To Exacting Standards

Contracts Can Be Undertaken On Behalf Of Builders Or Home Improvement Companies Or Directly For Commercial OrDomestic Customers

British Standard Windows

 

THE SASH WINDOWS COMPANY is dedicated to providing a level of quality workmanship second to none in the construction industry. Our fitters are all highly qualified and experienced in fitting all types of windows..

FINANCE

We are able to offer contact fitting services anywhere within the United Kingdom

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Contact Details

E-mail: trevor@easyboo.com


FREE PHONE 0800 881 8103

Or In writing to:

The Contracts Director
SASH WINDOWS
58 Speeton Avenue
Bradford
West Yorkshire BD7 4NQ

 

Fitters & Contractors Required In All Areas: Free Registration

Extract from Wikipedia

A sash window or hung sash window is made of one or more movable panels or "sashes" that form a frame to hold panes of glass which are often separated from other panes (or "lights") by narrow muntin bars.[1] Although any window with this style of glazing is technically "a sash", the term is used almost exclusively to refer to windows where the glazed panels are opened by sliding vertically, or horizontally in a style known as a "Yorkshire light" or sliding sash. Sash windows are common in Europe and former colonies including the United States and many developing nations. The design of the sash window is attributed to the English scientist and inventor, Robert Hooke[2]. The oldest known examples of sash windows were installed in England in the 1670s, for example at Ham House, London[3]. The sash window is often found in Georgian and Victorian houses, and the classic arrangement has three panes across by two up on each of two sashes, giving a "six over six" panel window, although this is by no means a fixed rule. Innumerable late Victorian and Edwardian suburban houses were built in England using standard sash window units approximately 4 feet (1.2m) in width, but older, hand-made units could be of any size

 

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